Chambord Castle France

Chambord Castle France

France

Chambord Castle France

Chambord Castle France – Chambord Castle in the Loire Valley is one of the most famous castles in France in the world. The castle is famous for its Renaissance architecture and its combination with medieval architecture. Chambord Castle was built by Francis I as a hunting ground but later became the largest Renaissance castle in the Loire Valley. . The Royal Chambord Hunt was built in 1519 by King Francis I of the Valois family. This place was very popular among kings like Henry II and Louis XIV who loved hunting. Although Chambord was never completed, it is still the largest castle in the Loire Valley. Chambord Castle was seldom used for a long time in history, and therefore retained much of its appearance. Part of the interior was changed during the eighteenth century when the castle was chosen to be inhabited by Stanislaus Leszczynski and the Saxon Marshal; However, the main structure remains intact and, as it amazed Emperor Charles V, it amazes you.

Chambord Castle France

Chambord, a hunting ground for Francis I – Chambord Castle France
The French King, often known as Francis I, ordered the construction of Chambord Castle as a hunting ground in 1519. Although the central tower of the castle is built in the medieval style, the surrounding trenches and fortifications have two wings, two towers, and a perimeter wall of Renaissance architecture; A style that François became acquainted with during the Battle of Italy. Although Chambord was built as a hunting ground, it later became the largest castle in the Loire Valley. Chambord with 156 meters in length and 56 meters in height, has wide and amazing dimensions. 426 rooms of this castle are completed with 282 fireplaces and 77 stars. More than 800 sculpted columns support the castle. The first Frenchman hoped to impress Charles V, the Holy Roman Emperor, with the construction of this castle. He succeeded in this as well. The emperor visited the castle in 1539 and described Chambord as a summary of the achievements of the human industry. The first Frenchman died in 1547 and during his 32-year reign, he stayed in Chambord for only 72 days. At the time of his death, only the central tower and the sides of the castle were built. Henry II, son of Francis I, and then Louis XVI both loved to hunt and continued to build the castle. Louis XIV changed several rooms in the castle to reflect his thoughts on royal rites and ceremonies. These government apartments have a set of waiting rooms, special rooms, and private rooms, similar to those found in the Palace of Versailles. And were equipped. As a result, modern-day visitors are confronted with only empty structures that date back centuries but are still amazing.

Chambord in the eighteenth century – Chambord Castle France
It was only during the eighteenth century that Chambord Castle saw its inhabitants for a time. However, the castle was an unsuitable residence and was used for only about 12 years. The first permanent resident of the castle was the father of Louis XV, Stanislaw Leszynski, the deposed King of Poland. He lived in Chambord from 1725 to 1733, but when he lost the throne for the second time in 1736, he considered moving to Laurent in northeastern France. Marshall Morris of Saxony also served from 1745 to 1750, thanks to his many services The French army settled in the castle. This charming character was the son of Saxon Augustus the Great. He was one of Augustus’ eight illegitimate children, by his admission, although there were rumors that Augustus had more than 350 illegitimate children. Marshall Morris was very successful in serving in various European armies, but it was the French army that made the most of his presence and eventually gave him the title of Marshal. He died of pneumonia at Chambord, but there were rumors that Marshall Morris’s death was due to a duel over the wife of a nobleman. Warmed up. He was the one who introduced the French to the French by bringing clay heaters from his native Saxony. Most of the boards and fixtures are a reflection of the time of Marshall Morris.

Chambord Castle France

Chambord after the French Revolution
The accessories and artwork in Chambord were auctioned off after the French Revolution. Some of the castle floorboards and wooden wall panels were even sold. The castle eventually fell to a private owner. The last famous person to take ownership of the castle was Count Chambord, the last member of the Bourbon dynasty. He owned the castle from 1821 until he died in 1883. After the defeat of the Second French Empire from Prussia in 1871, the throne was proposed to this count. He turned down the offer because he refused to go under the tricolor flag. France eventually returned to a republic. Although Kent Chambord owned the castle for six decades, he stayed in Chambord for only three days. In 1930, Chambord eventually became a national asset. During the outbreak of World War II, Chambord housed several works of art from the Louvre, such as the Mona Lisa and Venus Milo. Chambord, as a national monument, has been beautifully restored, but like any other old house, the renovation is still going on. Chambord Castle was inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1981, and the rest of the Loire Valley was added 19 years later.

Louis XIV of France

Medieval France, with its feudal theme, is one of the few countries in the world where its monuments, buildings, and architectural beauties still dazzle the eyes and attract millions of people as tourists every year. And to the city of Tours and its continuation to the south of France, along the Loire Sea, which is the cradle of the French Renaissance civilization, look at the castles and palaces built by the French kings and still standing today. With the first view of the beautiful valley of the French kings or the valley of the Laura, which has founded and preserved the French Renaissance in architecture in its heart. Several castles and palaces on the right and left of the sea, have maintained their negligence until now, and despite changes in the political, social, and economic process, France still retains its prominence in world civilization.

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