Charles de Gaulle France

Charles de Gaulle France

France

Charles de Gaulle France

Charles de Gaulle France – Charles de Gaulle was born on November 22, 1890, in Lille, France, and died in 1970. He was a French soldier, writer, statesman, and architect of the Fifth French Republic. If you are touring France, the first place you meet Charles de Gaulle is the main airport in Paris.

Education and primary occupation – Charles de Gaulle France
Charles de Gaulle was the second son of a middle-class Catholic and nationalist family. The family brought in several historians and writers, and his father taught philosophy and literature, but as a young boy, de Gaulle soon became interested in military matters. He attended the Saint-Cyr Military Academy and in 1913 joined the infantry as a young second lieutenant under the command of Colonel Philip Patten. He had high self-confidence and remarkable courage. During World War I, he fought in Verdun. In this battle, de Gaulle was wounded three times and his name was mentioned three times to leave the battlefield. He even spent two years and eight months as a prisoner of war, during which time he made five unsuccessful attempts to escape. After a brief visit to Poland as a member of a military mission, a year of training at San Sier, and a two-year special training course in strategy and tactics at the College of War, he was promoted to Marshal in 1925. Patten became an employee of the High Council of War. From 1927 to 1929, de Gaulle served as a senior officer in the army following the occupation of the Rhineland and was able to see the potential danger of a German invasion and the inadequacy of the French defense. He also spent two years in the Middle East, after which he was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel and spent four years as a member of the National Defense Council. He continued with his articles on the concept of leadership. De Gaulle’s study of military theory defended the idea of ​​a fully mechanized and mobile small professional army, preferring it to the static theories used to defend France against German attacks. He also wrote a note in which he tried to persuade politicians with his way of thinking. De Gaulle’s views had made him unpopular with his seniors in the military, and his claim for the right to publish a historical study under his name led to controversy with Marshall Patten.

Charles de Gaulle France

WWII – Charles de Gaulle France
At the beginning of World War II, de Gaulle commanded a tank brigade from the French Fifth Army. In May 1940, he had the opportunity for the second time to test his theories of tank warfare. He has been hailed as an admirable, energetic, and courageous leader. In June of that year, he joined Paul Reno’s government as Deputy Secretary of War and went on many missions to Britain to explore the possibility of continuing the war. When the Reno government was replaced ten days later by the government of Marshall Patten, which intended a ceasefire with the Germans, de Gaulle went to England. On June 18, he first expressed his interest in continuing the war under his leadership from his compatriots in London. On August 2, 1940, a French military court sentenced him to death, restitution, and confiscation of property. He had only a handful of novice and volunteer political supporters around him who later became “Free France” forces. He had no political credentials and was almost unknown in France and Britain, But de Gaulle had a strong belief in his mission, and his commitment enabled him to learn all the qualities needed to lead. He was completely devoted to France, and his strong character led him to defend the interests of his country. Against Patten, he was considered the national champion and the only French field marshal. De Gaulle’s reports from London, the activities of the Free French Forces, and the connections of French resistance groups with De Gaulle’s organ, or those who worked for the British secret services, all made the leader nationally famous. Of course, his full recognition by his allies came only after the liberation of Paris in August 1944. In London, de Gaulle’s relations with the British government were never easy, and he added to these problems with his erroneous judgments and sensitivities. In 1943 he moved his main pieces to Algeria, where he became chairman of the French National Liberation Committee. De Gaulle’s successful campaign against Giro was a testament to his political maneuvering skills. In September 1944, de Gaulle moved with his informal government from Algeria to Paris.

Charles de Gaulle France

Married to Yvonne de Gaulle
De Gaulle married Yvonne Vendroux in 1921 and they had three children together: Philippe, who was born in the same year and later became a French senator and admiral; Elizabeth, who was born in 1924; He was born four years later but died in 1948 earlier than his sister.

Elysee France

Fifth President

The French government, known as the Fourth Republic, weakened in the late 1950s, and de Gaulle returned to public service to help his country. He made a significant contribution to the formation of the next government and was appointed its president in January 1959. With the establishment of the Fifth Republic, de Gaulle devoted himself to improving the economic situation of his country, and his efforts were to preserve the independence of the country. He also tried to separate France from the other two powers, the Soviet Union and the United States. To demonstrate the country’s military capabilities, de Gaulle successfully pursued a nuclear weapons program. De Gaulle was not afraid to make controversial decisions. After overcoming years of Algerian uprisings, he helped the French colony until it gained independence in 1962. This move was not very popular at that time. De Gaulle supported the idea of ​​a united Europe, but he wanted Europe to be free from the influence of the superpowers. He fought to keep Britain out of the European Economic Community because he had a close relationship with the United States. In 1966, de Gaulle withdrew his troops from NATO. For some, de Gaulle was an anti-American. Although this can not be denied, most of his work should be considered the result of his strongly nationalist views.

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