Cuban Art

Cuban Art

Cuba

Cuban Art

Cuban Art – The ISA School of Art is one of the most important art schools in Cuba and has a distinctive exhibition space that can well display the art of the Third World. Collectively evaluated and includes art calendars. Cuba’s new art has undergone surveys during the liberation period. Be. The use of performing arts in this country has created a strong economic atmosphere so that people have been able to examine the exhibition policies for this sector. There is a precise approach in the list of specific arts in this country. The country has been able to include the exact position of art. Art schools in Cuba have greatly improved. The artistic atmosphere in this country has been able to have certain effects on traditional handicrafts. It has been studied that art in this country can have strict policies. In the artistic path of this country, a series of schools can be seen that have studied individual arts. The art that is seen in this country about the painting space is evaluated by the government and gives you various loans.

Cuban Art

Reputable Cuban critic Gerardo Masucra, who is also very close to his country’s contemporary art, rightly calls the third generation of Cuban artists of the late twentieth century “post-idealistic.” This general sense of insecurity and unrest due to economic turmoil, changes in colonial practices in the region, changes resulting from civilization, new technology, closer communication facilities with other cultures, tourism, and intensified. Although these influences changed the foundations of Caribbean culture and their relationship to other parts of the world, they never matched the tremendous impact they had on contemporary art in those regions. The new culture replaced the idealistic ideologies of the past with a new political consciousness in which a particular focus on culture and a return to identity were emphasized. Stuart Hall, a contemporary historian, and cultural theorist writes of Caribbean culture: “What I once thought was fragmented and incoherent has paradoxically become a modern representational experience.” What is now called Cuban modern art dates back to the early 1980s. , Has grown and expanded with the establishment of exhibitions such as “First Office” * in 1981 at the International Center for the Arts in Havana. Rodriguez Barry, Leonard Soto and were exposed to the public. But what was interesting about this exhibition was the variety of visual spaces on display.

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The exhibition can be seen as a symbol of the university’s profound impact on the new Cuban art movement. Although the works of the First Office Exhibition were the first examples of this art in Cuba, this movement had a profound effect on shaping the foundation of the New Art movement in Cuba in the 1980s and 1990s. For example, “Flavio Garciandia in that new era was moving towards conceptualism and the announcement of a presence in the field of modern Cuban art. Also and Badia were undoubtedly more influenced by their personal, mythological, spiritual, and political thoughts and insights. . The Biennale was founded in 1984 as an exhibition of Latin American art, but in 1986 it expanded to the Third World Art Exhibition. -Performance – was. In addition, the Havana Biennale was a gathering place for like-minded artists and critics from all over the world. Before (compared to modern Western art) Cuban modern art began more in the period of liberation and final victory of the country. This period was the first time that the artist displayed his political and ideological thoughts in his art. Such an example can be seen in the works of Lazaro Saundra, a Cuban artist (born in 1,964). Saundra exhibited his work in the mid-1980s.In the aftermath of the Cuban Revolution, he was a unique artist with critical and reporter work. Filled with humanitarian and humane sentiments, Lazaro Saudra’s works benefited from biting and political satire. “All artists from every religion and creed” was written. At the bottom of this altar was a device for measuring the extent of ideological deviations.

Cuban Art

In the early 1980s, another artist, Leonardo Soto, used official photographs of Che Guevara and Fidel Castro in his collages and works, which spread throughout the world until the late 1980s. Politically, there were Saudra and Soto, more protesting artists. For example, Thomas Esson, born in 1963, portrayed the combined face of Castro and Che Guevara with a grotesque, sickly visual space.
In his famous work “My Tribute to What” in the year one thousand nine hundred and eighty-seven, he depicts Che Guevara in the background, with a face resembling a black man, and in front of the image are two human bodies. Intertwined, they take up half the face of this Latin American revolutionary leader. But none of this was hidden from the Cuban authorities, who reacted differently to such artists with warnings and bans. One of the most important and controversial events of this kind was the closing of the Esson solo exhibition. It was in the Havana Grand Gallery in 1980. Maheen was the same exhibition that displayed the work “I was great about what.” National figures and symbols will be banned by Cuban artists. Cuban art is one of the most prolific art schools of the last century in the Caribbean, which has been able to spread its voice to other art lovers around the world and perhaps in this way the voice of many countries. For example, advances in the art of the Dominican Republic have not been heard properly. Artists such as Tony Kaplan, Belquis Ramirez, and Marcus Laura Reid. The Dominican Republic established the Santo Domingo Caribbean and Central American Painting Biennale in 1902. A biennial that seems to benefit from closer ties with regional artists.

Cuban National University of the Arts
The Cuban National University of the Arts was originally founded by Fidel Castro and Che Guevara and is probably the greatest architectural achievement of the Cuban Revolution, but unfortunately, the idealistic fervor of the Cuban people only lasted for a short time and the university quickly The creative design of the colleges, which was pursued to bring cultural literacy to the society, shows the ideal and fundamental image of the Cuban revolution. Unfortunately, the idealistic passion of the Cuban people only lasted for a short time. Speed ​​was neglected. Schools were abandoned for decades without ever being completed. Today, nearly forty years after the abandonment of the work, the architects returned to the building to return the half-abandoned schools to their heyday.

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